Tag Archives: Windmill comics

Runners up of week 27: Captain Roffa, Nick Fury, Invincible

2. Captain Roffa#2 / SUPER comics #2434 (Windmill comics)
I recently stocked up on all titles published by Rotterdam-based Dutch comic publisher Windmill Comics, so expect to see some of their products popping up in the following weeks. First up, Captain Roffa number two. This series stars Rotterdam’s own superhero while also offering a tongue-in-cheek Shazam parody. As in the first issue (click here to read my review), the first thing to strike me is the art. In contrary to the first issue, this one is in color and it’s amazing to see the detail in the thick-lined, tight cartooning of artist Boykoesh. Every issue of this series contains two stories. While these eight page comedy-adventure stories aren’t really to my taste, I have to admit that they are executed very well by writer Johan de Neef. The first story tells of an encounter with the Night Vampire (who looks an awful lot like Rotterdam’s own Jules Deelder) and in the second Captain Roffa gets help from the Giant of Rotterdam (back in the 1940’s the tallest man in the Netherlands). The biggest weaknesses of this issue are the two pinups: personally, I think they are a big step down from regular series artist Boykoesh, and I would really have liked these pages to be filled with more enjoyable content, such as the OHOTMU-style character bios’ that separate the two stories. But that’s just nitpicking: this issue is all kinds of fun and I hope it finds the hands of as much young readers as possible. If this won’t hook them on comics, I don’t know what will!
Art: 8              Writing: 7       Overall: 7.5

3. Strange Tales 150-156 (Marvel Comics, 1966)
This nearly comprises the first half of the 2000 Nick Fury, Agent of SHIELD trade paperback. I had always heard of the legend that is Jim Steranko, but other than his iconic covers was not familiar with his work. This trade paperback is basically a showcase of his first work in comics (besides these he had only done two Harvey Comics). The first three issues Steranko worked over layouts by Jack Kirby, with words by Stan Lee. Then there were two issues written by Roy Thomas and full art by Steranko and after that Steranko handled both writing and art. The first issue that was fully done by Steranko was a step backwards, he was still clearly getting his sea legs. But after that it Dyna-soars upward! Dynamic, cinematic action shown through groundbreaking sequential storytelling, makes this super spy caper a delight for the eye. On the writing side, things gradually get better from Stan Lee, to Roy Thomas, to finally Steranko unleashed. The first couple of installments clearly have more than enough word balloons obscuring the art in a manner that we have come to know from working the Marvel method. But still, if you take it for what it is –a fun throw back, over the top sci-fi, super spy series- you WILL be enjoying yourself
Art: 8              Writing: 7       Overall: 7.5

4. Invincible #92 (Image comics)
Many people have said it before, and most of the time I didn’t agree, but this issue really made me feel that Invincible has peaked and now is struggling along. I love the characters, the writing and the art –normally. But in this issue Robert Kirkman’s writing felt disjointed and the art was just not as good as I have become used to of Ryan Ottley. Sadly the same goes for the pages drawn by Cory Walker. While the overall plot is enjoyable and fun –Invincible is depowered and Robot and Monster Girl talk about what happened when they were in another dimension (for 700 years!), the subplots left me entirely cold and the one with ‘black Invincible’ even made me cringe…
Art: 7              Writing: 6       Overall: 6.5

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My Stripfestival Breda 2011 swag

Today, the whole family went to the city of Breda; wife and kid went clothes shopping; while I went to one of the Netherland’s biggest comic convention, the Stripfestival Breda. It was a great chance to meet people I had only known through the internet (Hello there, Gert-Jan van Oosten), as well as seeing some crazy talented creators in action, like Ian Churchill, Mark Schultz, Igor Kordey as well as the folks from smaller Dutch publishers DROP comics and Windmill comics. Of course, I also got some good swag:

I’m finally going to get balls deep into DROP comics, having bought all of their output: Sanguis #0, #1, #2 (premiered today at Breda), as well as ACE issues zero and one.  From Windmill comics I picked up Rotterdam’s own superhero: Captain Roffa, which came with a sweet, sweet sketch of Cable by Boykoesh. I also got two trades, which have been on my to-buy-list for a long time: the Authority book one and three. Lastly, I met this friendly Flamish guy Rob Croonenborghs who has recently published a U.S. comic through 215Ink: Jezus Hates Zombies. Like all the work at his table I looked at, it looks awesome and he gives away free sketches, with everything he sells. So he decorated my copy of Jezus Hates Zombies with a great sketch of Jezus versus Wolverine.

Oh, and to top it all of, when I got home I found that the first issue of Gladstone’s School for World Conquerors had arrived. Thanks dethfilm!

Expect reviews of all this stuff in the following weeks. Even though I had a really tight spending budget I had a great time at the Stripfestival, and if anyone who’s reading this gets a chance to go there tomorrow (sunday the 10th of September) I highly recommend them to go there. If not to buy comics, then to meet some very talented and likable people!